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CRVI receives TVA educational outreach award

UVa-Wise News - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 2:09pm

The Clinch River Valley Initiative was recently selected for the Tennessee River Basin Network’s Aquatic Biodiversity Award for work in education and outreach initiatives in the region.

“The Network’s coverage area spans all the way from northern Georgia through the Smokies, Asheville, and to our region and westward into Tennessee, so it’s a big honor to be selected,” said Wally Smith, assistant professor of biology at The University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

UVa-Wise is a partner with CRVI and many employees of the College work on CRVI’s educational outreach efforts.

“We’ve had a number of students and alumni contribute to the work we received the award for, including the curriculum book we recently published and CRVI’s annual Clinch River Environmental Education Symposium for K-12 science educators,” Smith added.

At a recent meeting, the Tennessee Valley Authority gave awards to partner groups in two categories: Education/Outreach and Science/Management. A $5,000 cash prize was donated to each winner’s Environmental Conservation organization of choice. CRVI received the award for its project that focused on educating children and adults on aquatic biodiversity and the importance of Virginia’s Hidden River.

“These award winners, like those in the past, are well deserving of this recognition,” Evan Crews, senior manager of Natural Resources Management for TVA, said in a news release. “Their accomplishments represent the dedicated people and organizations that care for—and have had an enormous positive impact on—water resources and the aquatic biodiversity throughout the Tennessee River Basin.”

The Tennessee River Basin Network is a joint effort organized by TVA, with strong support by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Aquarium. Partnership groups include federal agencies and tribal nations, state Agencies and regional partnerships, and non-governmental organizations and local community groups.

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Truck-In Thursday at Alumni Hall

UVa-Wise Calendar - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 11:00am

This Week’s Food Truck is:

The Morning Star Trolley

Visit The Morning Star Trolley on Facebook

 

Meet at Alumni Hall on Thursdays for fun, food and friendship.

We will feature a different food truck each week.

Follow us on Facebook @UVaWiseAlumni for more information.

All food trucks gladly accept cash or credit.

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Greek Life Recruitment Registration

UVa-Wise Calendar - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 10:00am

GO GREEK this fall and register recruitment.

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Clark shares tombstone research

UVa-Wise News - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 5:03pm

Amy Clark, professor of rhetoric at UVa-Wise, learned a lot about the rituals associated with death and funerals at an early age.

As a child, Clark would accompany her grandfather, who worked in a funeral home, as he transported bodies from nursing homes and hospitals. At the funeral home, he taught her about the embalming process, and she recalled how he would also dig the graves and then slip on a suit the next day to handle the actual funeral.

The experience helped the young Clark see and study funeral rituals. In the process, she developed a keen interest in cemeteries and tombstones. She recalled how Decoration Day, an event in Appalachia where family members gather to spruce up cemeteries and gravestones each year as an expression of respect, also made an impact on her.

“I started to see the cemeteries and gravestones as a researcher before I became a researcher,” Clark said.

She shared what she learned about the rhetoric of death in Appalachia in a lecture Wednesday.

She did doctorial research on the topic and later expanded the research with two of her former students. She shared the research during the Scholars’ Week lecture series before a large crowd. Fascinating information may be gathered from the size and shape of tombstones, the placement of graves in a cemetery, and how men, women and children were viewed in life and in death. A walk through a cemetery can yield answers about cause of death and social rank as well. In many ways, a cemetery and headstones act as a visitor’s center that offers glimpses of history and social attitudes.

“They can tell us a lot,” she said. “It is a museum that quietly grows larger.”

Cemeteries show where power is concentrated in a society since the bigger stones suggest wealth and status, Clark explained. And the wealthy and influential people are normally in the center of a cemetery.

“It’s what money can buy,” she added.

Cemeteries and tombstones also show how women and men are represented in death, Clark explained. Men were often memorialized by occupation while women were touted for domestic roles. Clark’s research examined a cemetery in Northern Appalachia and in Central Appalachia. The Appalachia region is more diverse than outsiders realize, she said, adding that immigration trends and the Industrial Revolution are factors in diversification.

She found similar causes of death on tombstones as she researched both Appalachian regions. Men tended to die from occupational accidents or even homicide, but women were more likely to die in childbirth or from contracting a disease from their children. The information on some of the tombstones from 100 years or so served as a crude obituary, Clark said.

Women rarely got their full names listed on tombstones that they shared with husbands, and were often listed by a first name only with wording that indicated they were the wife of their husbands. Basically, men got their names listed on the headstones twice, she added. By the 20th century, tombstones tended to include both a first and last name for women.

Women were also celebrated for their roles as wives and mothers, and men were lauded for their occupations, Clark said.

Clark noted that grave markers from the year 2000 up have shifted back to stones with more opportunities for individualism to appear in color of the stones or in other design. Some tombstones today offer QR codes that allow a person to snap a picture with a smartphone and learn more about the person buried in that particular grave.

“I think we’re going to see changes,” Clark said. “Cemeteries are not going to be quiet places anymore.”

 

 

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“The Rhetoric of Death in Appalachia”

UVa-Wise Calendar - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 1:00pm

Lecture by Amy Clark, professor of rhetoric

Free and open to the public, approved for cultural activity credit

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Student Organization President & Advisor Meeting

UVa-Wise Calendar - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 1:00pm

Attend the Student Organization President & Advisor Meeting to hear updates for the 2017-2018 academic year, receive Clery Act training, and learn about the new Student Organization Succss (SOS) workshops. *All current organization Presidents and Advisors

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Greek Life Recruitment Registration

UVa-Wise Calendar - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 10:00am

GO GREEK this fall and register recruitment.

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Volleyball Opens 2017 Season at Virginia State Tournament Friday

UVa-Wise Sports - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 6:30am


WISE-- Kristen Salyer's sixth season on the bench directing the volleyball program at UVa-Wise will provide the coach with mix of veterans and newcomers. Her team returns just one senior but, overall the team has six players who saw action last season, including sophomore setter Morgan Milligan who handed out 767 assists as a freshman. Outside hitter/defensive specialist Samantha Edge (Roanoke, Va./Roanoke Catholic H.S.) is Salyer's lone senior while junior outside hitters Eustaica Smith (Dugspur, Va./Carroll County H.S.) and Ciara Kain (Leesburg, Va./Loudon County H.S.) also have court experience. Sophomore Briana Kerr (Virginia Beach, Va./Bayside H.S.) returns at libero to round out the six returners on the roster.
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Last Day to Add a New Course

UVa-Wise Calendar - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 12:00am

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“Science and the Ethics Question”

UVa-Wise Calendar - Tue, 08/29/2017 - 7:00pm

Roundtable discussion by UVa-Wise professors Anthony Cashio, Ryan Huish, Josephine Rodriguez and Walter Smith

Free and open to the public, approved for cultural activity credit

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Greek Life Recruitment Registration

UVa-Wise Calendar - Tue, 08/29/2017 - 10:00am

GO GREEK this fall and register recruitment.

The post Greek Life Recruitment Registration appeared first on UVa-Wise.

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First Coaches Show of the Year Set for Tonight at 7 p.m.

UVa-Wise Sports - Tue, 08/29/2017 - 9:51am


WISE - - The first coaches show for the 2017-18 UVa-Wise Athletic year will be hosted at Moon Dog Pizza in Wise by The Wolf FM 92.1 WDIC tonight, Aug. 29 at 7 p.m.  You can listen live on FM 92.1 The Wolf or by joining us live for pizza and drink specials.
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McKnight lectures on Lost Cause tenets

UVa-Wise News - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 6:51pm

A Civil War historian said Monday that Southern women spoon-fed their children a version of the war that put Confederate soldiers and the South in the best possible light, and that act of rewriting of history remains one of the reasons the Lost Cause is still around today.

In a timely lecture, Brian McKnight, a professor of history at The University of Virginia’s College at Wise, explored the six tenets of the Lost Cause of the Civil War and explained how the related interpretation of the war in the South relates to the monument controversy today. McKnight said the tenets, which include assertions that secession not slavery caused the war, slaves were content, the North won because of its resources and number of soldiers, Confederates soldiers were heroes, Union soldiers were villains, and that loyal, Southern women reacted to the sacrifice of their Southern men.

According to McKnight, academics have long rejected the romanticized Lost Cause, but he said it has cast a shadow from the end of the Civil War to the present. The events in Charlottesville that erupted after city council attempted to remove a statute of Robert E. Lee has the nation talking again, McKnight said in the first of the Scholars’ Week lectures. He said people are asking questions about erasing history, placing statutes in public parks with solid interpretations of the Civil War, and they are asking why people are only just complaining about Confederate statutes.

“We erase history every single day,” McKnight said, explaining that people rub out parts of their own history daily. “It makes today much more livable.”

McKnight said complaints were voiced about Civil War monuments before now, but people generally did not listen.

“We ignored them,” he said.

Many of the monuments were placed in communities that were primarily white at the time, but demographics changed. Monuments that are controversial today are generally the ones that celebrate the cause and not the war dead, he explained. It is much easier to live with a monument to the dead that one that is a monument to the cause, he said.

There is no question that it was slavery and not secession that caused the Civil War, he said. The economy of slavery in the United States was twice as valuable as the railroad industry, he added. Wording in the sucession ordinances clearly show slavery was the driving issue, he said, adding that 20 slaves in 1860 would be worth $1 million in today’s currency.

The tenet that the North had overwhelming manpower and technology is somewhat true, but research reveals that about 94 percent of eligible Southerners were in the Confederate army, but just 24 percent of Northerners were fighting for the Union, McKnight added.

Overall, the Southern women who took liberties when explaining to their young children why their late father or other relatives fought for the Confederacy perpetuated the Lost Cause for generations, he said. It was the United Daughters of the Confederacy who rallied around the Lost Cause. The result was dozens of publicly supported Confederate monuments.

“One hundred years ago is when the history of the Civil War in the South was being rewritten in public spaces across the South,” McKnight said.

Scholars’ Week is sponsored by the UVa-Wise Lecture Committee.

 

 

 

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Cavs Open 2017 Gridiron Slate Thursday at Glenville State

UVa-Wise Sports - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 1:03pm


WISE - - College football begins Thursday as UVa-Wise and Glenville State College have the honors of being one of three games in the Mountain East Conference on the season's opening night. A year ago, the Cavaliers claimed six wins in Dane Damron's first season at the helm of the program, including a 26-17 home victory over the Pioneers.  The six wins, coupled with 14 returning starters and a cast of talented recruits have expectations high for the Cavaliers in year two of the Damron regime. Coaches picked UVa-Wise fourth in the MEC Preseason Poll while their opponent Glenville State was picked eighth in the same poll.
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“Appalachia’s Civil War as a Subaltern Experience”

UVa-Wise Calendar - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 1:00pm

Lecture by  Brian McKnight, Professor of History

Free and open to the public, approved for cultural activity credit

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Student Organization President & Advisor Meeting

UVa-Wise Calendar - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 1:00pm

Attend the Student Organization President & Advisor Meeting to hear updates for the 2017-2018 academic year, receive Clery Act training, and learn about the new Student Organization Succss (SOS) workshops. *All current organization Presidents and Advisors must attend*

The post Student Organization President & Advisor Meeting appeared first on UVa-Wise.

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Greek Life Recruitment Registration

UVa-Wise Calendar - Mon, 08/28/2017 - 10:00am

GO GREEK this fall and register recruitment.

The post Greek Life Recruitment Registration appeared first on UVa-Wise.

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Meet the Greeks-Recruitment Kick Off

UVa-Wise Calendar - Sun, 08/27/2017 - 4:00pm

Join the UVa-Wise fraternitiies and sororities to learn more about “Going Greek”, enjoy a free cookout, and play games on the lawn.

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